New ED i3 Priorities, FWS Awards and SNAP Advocacy

June 6, 2011 | By Adrianne Fielding | Post a Comment

It occurred to me this afternoon that FundingAttractions.com has been live for just over four months now.  Since I’m a data geek (a Math Team veteran, actually), I wanted to see how that tallied up.  The 137 posts we’ve published since early February have generated over 10,000 views and over 150 subscribers, which is really quite humbling.  And since it’s been a while since I’ve said so — thank you, most sincerely, for your interest and participation in what we’re doing here.  If you’re a new reader, welcome!  I wholeheartedly subscribe to the Chris Brogan school of blogging that maintains that a blog is only as successful as it is helpful to its readers.  In fact, our cardinal rule is to be helpful.  So tell us what you like, what you want, what you think and how we can be more helpful.  Really.  We mean that.

Now, on to the Monday miscellaneous.  Here are some of the funding-related items that have caught my eye over the past few days…

The second round of the Department of Education’s Investing in Innovation (i3) program is now open, with $150 million available for awards in three categories: scale-up grants, validation grants and development grants.  All applicants must address one of the program’s five priority areas for reform. In addition to the three original priority areas  — supporting effective teachers and principals, implementing high standards and quality assessments, and turning around persistently low-performing schools — this funding round introduces two new priorities that focus on (1) achievement and high school graduation rates in rural schools and (2) promoting science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.  Applications are due on Aug. 2, 2011.

The Fish and Wildlife Service has  announced six awards through its competitive State Wildlife Grants program for multistate, cooperative conservation projects to help conserve and recover species of greatest conservation need.

In the face of deficit-reduction threats to potentially cut or even dismantle the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, which was formerly known as food stamps), the program’s proponents recently delivered a letter with more than 2,500 organizational signatories to members of Congress and the White House.

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