USDA, Labor Provide $200M for SNAP Pilot Projects

March 24, 2015 | By Jerry Ashworth | Post a Comment

work-4-680529-mNow this should be interesting. The departments of Agriculture and Labor have awarded some $200 million in competitive awards to 10 states to fund pilot projects designed to help Supplemental Nutrition and Assistance Program (SNAP) participants find jobs and work toward self-sufficiency. Such pilots will be conducted in California, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Vermont, Virginia and Washington.

Authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill, the pilot projects will focus on target populations identified by the legislation, including individuals with low skills, able-bodied adults without dependents and SNAP recipients working in very low-wage or part-time jobs. The pilots, which are being funded for three years, will assess various approaches including skills training, work-based learning, support services such as transportation and child care, and other job-driven strategies.

According to Labor Secretary Tom Perez, “These grants are the result of unprecedented collaboration and an unparalleled focus on using every available tool to help people get access to good jobs and a firm grip on the ladder of opportunity. By testing and then applying proven strategies across the federal government and throughout the workforce system, we’re taking on the unfinished business of the remarkable economic recovery under way — making sure that every person can share in the prosperity being created and that the promise of opportunity extends to all.”

Interim results of the evaluation will be reported every 12 months until the projects are complete. We’re not sure what the eventual results of these pilots will be but hopefully they will lead to positive outcomes for the future of SNAP. Good luck to those states selected. If you would like to find out more about these pilot projects, go to USDA’s SNAP Employment and Training Pilots website.

Let us know what you think about these SNAP pilots and if you think they will truly help SNAP recipients.

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